Gray Roots Levels Up Fun With New ‘Game Changer’ Exhibit

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Sam and Eli Nuremberger were lucky enough to visit the Gray Roots Museum and Archives on Saturday afternoon.

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Little did the brothers know that their trip to the museum would include two rooms showcasing the interactive history of video games.

The traveling Game Changers exhibit opened to the public on Friday night, and by Saturday afternoon, 10-year-old Sam and 6-year-old Eli were standing behind giant Nintendo controllers playing the classic Super Mario Bros. rice field. He is one of several booths featuring interactive gameplay.

The controller is so large that it required Eli to control the directional pad, Sam to press the ‘A’ and ‘B’ buttons, and the brothers to play cooperatively.

Game Start.

Eli and Sam Nürnberger play Super Mario Bros. with a giant Nintendo controller at the Game Changers exhibition currently on at the Gray Roots Museum and Archives.Greg Cowan/Sun Times
Eli and Sam Nürnberger play Super Mario Bros. with a giant Nintendo controller at the Game Changers exhibition currently on at the Gray Roots Museum and Archives.Greg Cowan/Sun Times

Brody Simpson, meanwhile, was playing an arcade game created decades before it was born on another interactive station. According to the brief on display, Mr. Simpson began his career from the late 1970s, hailed as the golden age of arcade games, as advances in hardware and software allowed for more complex and visually engaging experiences. Throughout his early 1980s, he switched between the classic games of Pac-Man, Starhawk, and Galaxian.

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The Game Changer exhibit is a maze of different game booths and interactive exhibits. I have an arcade game from 1971. It’s a Nintendo 64 with a giant controller. giant gameboy. “Shredding Station” by Guitar Hero. Plus, there’s a more educational area where patrons hear from the Canadian game designer and learn about the evolution of video games from single pixels to immersive alternate realities.

From pom to today’s photorealistic games.

Brody Simpson, 6, plays an early arcade game from the video game era at the current Game Changers exhibit at the Gray Roots Museum and Archives.Greg Cowan/Sun Times
Brody Simpson, 6, plays an early arcade game from the video game era at the current Game Changers exhibit at the Gray Roots Museum and Archives.Greg Cowan/Sun Times

The exhibit outlines changes in storytelling, graphics, technology, audio, and gameplay over the years and decades, showing how the industry has evolved over time as technological advances and the creativity of game designers have evolved. It gives you a window into how you keep “leveling up”.

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Canadian video game development will generate an estimated $3.4 billion in revenue in 2021, according to an industry study conducted by the Canadian Entertainment Software Association. The country is home to some of the world’s largest game development studios, including EA Canada, BioWare, and Ubisoft.

The Game Changers exhibit made stops at the Canadian Museum of Science and Technology in Virginia, Ohio, Mississippi, Regina, Vancouver, Halifax, Ottawa, and more before stopping in Owen Sound.

The Game Changers exhibit runs through September 4th at the Gray Roots Museum.

Meanwhile, the Gray Roots Museum also celebrates the launch of Abundance, an updated version of the Gray County Gallery, with relics, photographs, archival records and (soon to be) related to forest, agriculture and water sub-themes. exhibits play-based interactive activities. area.

“Gray County is characterized by a wealth of natural resources, whose lands, forests and waters have sustained and protected many of the people who called the area home and continue to do so. Settlement activities such as forestry, agriculture and industry have enabled countless generations to benefit from the natural world around them, opening up new livelihoods and opportunities.Gray County enjoys and maintains the rich natural resources found here. I keep doing.”

The “Abundance” exhibit at the Gray Roots Museum and Archives opened to the public on Friday, May 12, 2023.  Abundance will use artefacts, photography, archival records and (soon to be) play-based interactive activities related to the forest sub-theme. Agriculture and Water in Gray County.Greg Cowan/Sun Times
The “Abundance” exhibit at the Gray Roots Museum and Archives opened to the public on Friday, May 12, 2023. Abundance will use artefacts, photography, archival records and (soon to be) play-based interactive activities related to the forest sub-theme. Agriculture and Water in Gray County.Greg Cowan/Sun Times



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