CDC April 2023 Working-Age Population Mortality Data for 50 States

Financial Planners


According to the earliest mortality data, deaths in the United States for all ages in April were 5% to 7% higher than normal pre-pandemic levels.

All deaths between ages 25 and 64 were 2.2% lower than the typical number of deaths in April before the pandemic, but eight states reported deaths in that age group at least as low as before the pandemic. 8% higher. – Pandemics are normal.

See the gallery above for these 12 states.

See the table below for working-age deaths for all 50 states and other jurisdictions.

its meaning

Customers may be able to give up their masks and go dancing, but prudent life insurance and retirement planners must accept that predicting customer life expectancy will continue to be more difficult than it was before 2020. not.

This can affect decisions about how much a customer should buy life insurance and how much cash a retired customer should withdraw from their assets.

data

With the official end of the COVID-19 public health emergency, the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has cut back on providing data related to the COVID-19 pandemic, but death rates remain low. Some of the resources we track still exist.

According to the CDC spreadsheet, which is a series of figures showing the complete number of deaths by state by week, with figures adjusted for completeness in recent weeks, April’s Total deaths were 234,278, representing 5.4% higher than the April average. 2017, 2018, 2019.

The second premature mortality data, a collection of mortality spreadsheets that accompany the CDC’s weekly FluView report, shows that as of early May, the unadjusted all-ages raw national death toll in April was 218,247. It shows that you are a person.

This represents a 7.3% increase over the April 2019 FluView total as of early May 2019, and the April 2017, 2018 and April 2019 averages reported in early May of the corresponding years. 20% more than deaths.

FluView’s death toll for April includes approximately 4,800 confirmed cases of COVID-19. About 14,000 people had pneumonia that was not classified as novel coronavirus pneumonia. Others died from other causes, such as heart attacks and cancer.

One reason the relatively high death toll in April has gone unnoticed is that the death toll in April was far lower than the devastating January 2022 death toll. According to FluView data, 330,730 people died in the first four weeks of January 2022.

However, April 2022 was the month of a sharp drop in pandemic mortality, and according to FluView data, the number of deaths from all causes recorded in April 2023 for all ages is expected to drop in April 2022. 6% higher than the number of deaths recorded in

Another reason for the lack of attention may be that the increase in mortality affected the elderly more than the young in April. The number of deaths among US residents age 70 and older was 11% higher in April than in April, according to a CDC spreadsheet containing adjusted data. 2017-2019 baseline.

Insurer’s Perspective

Great West Lifeco CEO Paul Mahon spoke on the U.S. mortality rate on a conference call with securities analysts last week.

“One of the things we saw in the quarter was higher-than-expected mortality rates,” Mahon said. “Interestingly, our reinsurance business is kind of a leader in traditional life reinsurance in the US, and other insurers in the US are thinking the same thing.”

Mahon said the increased mortality could be the result of factors other than influenza and COVID-19.

Lincoln Financial Chief Financial Officer Chris Netipoe said on the company’s conference call that while the death rate is lower than in recent years, it’s still well above its pre-pandemic average, which would be a headwind.

Working-age deaths in April compared to the April average for 2017-2019

Deaths in April 2023

Average fatalities from 2017 to April 2019

2017-2019 changes

Alabama 1,061 1,100 -3.6%
Alaska 75 98 -23.7%
Arizona 1,283 1,092 +17.5%
Arkansas 615 618 -0.5%
California 4,494 4,780 -6.0%
Colorado 839 781 +7.4%
Connecticut 455 480 -5.2%
Delaware 193 147 +31.6%
District of Columbia 102 140 -27.0%
florida 3,651 3,738 -2.3%
Georgia 1,656 1,845 -10.2%
Hawaii 167 174 -3.8%
Idaho 231 204 +13.1%
Illinois 1,869 1,876 -0.4%
Indiana 1,043 1,251 -16.6%
Iowa 379 438 -13.4%
Kansas 494 448 +10.3%
Kentucky 932 1,064 -12.4%
Louisiana 248 985 -74.8%
maine 252 233 +8.2%
Maryland 884 1,017 -13.0%
Massachusetts 901 956 -5.7%
Michigan 1,844 1,786 +3.2%
Minnesota 510 649 -21.5%
Mississippi 598 682 -12.3%
Missouri 1,053 1,201 -12.3%
Montana 160 144 +11.4%
Nebraska 240 262 -8.5%
Nevada 610 518 +17.7%
new hampshire 179 204 -12.4%
new jersey 1,228 1,214 +1.1%
new mexico 443 380 +16.5%
new york 1,572 1,495 +5.1%
new york city 1,110 1,038 +6.9%
north carolina 1,915 1,880 +1.9%
north dakota 107 107 -0.3%
Ohio 2,457 2,339 +5.1%
Oklahoma 793 806 -1.7%
Oregon 659 610 +8.0%
Pennsylvania 2,112 2,236 -5.5%
Puerto Rico 527 475 +11.0%
rhode island 126 124 +1.9%
south carolina 1,096 1,023 +7.2%
south dakota 98 107 -8.4%
Tennessee 1,713 1,615 +6.0%
texas 4,097 4,102 -0.1%
Utah 383 368 +4.1%
Vermont 77 72 +6.5%
Virginia 1,306 1,302 +0.3%
Washington 1,090 952 +14.5%
west virginia 539 494 +9.0%
Wisconsin 825 823 +0.3%
Wyoming 75 61 +23.6%
total 51,366 52,534 -2.2%
Median +0.3%

(Image: Adobe Stock)



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